Wednesday, 2 March 2011

Air fares to include departure charge

via CAAI

Wednesday, 02 March 2011 15:01 Ellie Dyer

The charge levied on air passengers leaving Cambodia will be incorporated into ticket prices for those flying on or after April 1.

Norinda Khek, communications and marketing manager of airport management company Société Concessionnaire des Aéroports, said yesterday that the move was being made to “ease and speed-up processes at our airports”.

The passenger service charge is set at US$25 for adult foreigners and $13 for foreign children aged between two and 12. Cambodians are charged $18 and $10 respectively.

The charge included with tickets will be at foreigner rates, with Cambodians entitled to a refund of the difference at airports.

Passengers who booked flights on or after January 21 with the intention of flying in April or beyond have already had the fee included in their fares. It is also included in all domestic fares and Jetstar flights to Singapore.

All passengers flying before April 1 and those have not paid as part of their tickets must settle the fee at airports' counters.

A traveller who has been charged at booking but has changed plans to fly before April 1 is entitled to a refund to avoid being charged twice. The levy is a source of revenue for SCA and includes a security charge and value added tax .

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