Monday, 16 February 2009

Chum Manh, 78, one of the 14 Khmer Rouge prisoners who was survived the S-21 torture centre

Chum Manh, 78, one of the 14 Khmer Rouge prisoners who was survived the S-21 torture centre, shows how he was chained to former his cell at the Toul Sleng genocide museum in Phnom Penh January 31, 2009. The U.N.-backed Khmer Rouge tribunal opens its first trial on Tuesday when 66-year-old Duch, also known as Kaing Guek Eav, faces charges of war crimes, crimes against humanity, torture and homicide while he ran the S-21 torture centre. Picture taken January 31, 2009.To match feature CAMBODIA-ROUGE/ REUTERS/Chor Sokunthea (CAMBODIA)

Chum Manh, 78, one of the 14 Khmer Rouge prisoners who was survived the S-21 torture centre, shows his group photo in the Toul Sleng genocide museum in Phnom Penh January 31, 2009. The U.N.-backed Khmer Rouge tribunal opens its first trial on Tuesday when 66-year-old Duch, also known as Kaing Guek Eav, faces charges of war crimes, crimes against humanity, torture and homicide while he ran the S-21 torture centre. Picture taken January 31, 2009.To match feature CAMBODIA-ROUGE/ REUTERS/Chor Sokunthea (CAMBODIA)

Chum Manh, 78, one of the 14 Khmer Rouge prisoners who was survived the S-21 torture centre, looks through the fence at the Toul Sleng genocide museum in Phnom Penh January 31, 2009. The U.N.-backed Khmer Rouge tribunal opens its first trial on Tuesday when 66-year-old Duch, also known as Kaing Guek Eav, faces charges of war crimes, crimes against humanity, torture and homicide while he ran the S-21 torture centre. Picture taken January 31, 2009.To match feature CAMBODIA-ROUGE/ REUTERS/Chor Sokunthea (CAMBODIA)
Chum Manh, 78, one of the 14 Khmer Rouge prisoners who was survived the S-21 torture centre, talks in his cell at the Toul Sleng genocide museum in Phnom Penh January 31, 2009. The U.N.-backed Khmer Rouge tribunal opens its first trial on Tuesday when 66-year-old Duch, also known as Kaing Guek Eav, faces charges of war crimes, crimes against humanity, torture and homicide while he ran the S-21 torture centre. Picture taken January 31, 2009.To match feature CAMBODIA-ROUGE/ REUTERS/Chor Sokunthea (CAMBODIA)

Chum Manh, 78, one of the 14 Khmer Rouge prisoners who survived the S-21 torture centre, shows a painting in the Toul Sleng genocide museum in Phnom Penh January 31, 2009. The U.N.-backed Khmer Rouge tribunal opens its first trial on Tuesday when 66-year-old Duch, also known as Kaing Guek Eav, faces charges of war crimes, crimes against humanity, torture and homicide while he ran the S-21 torture centre. Picture taken January 31, 2009.To match feature CAMBODIA-ROUGE/ REUTERS/Chor Sokunthea (CAMBODIA)

1 comment:

mnztr said...

When I read Chum Manh's comments, I am simply awe struck by his strength. Astounding. His power to accept and forgive is beyond belief.